WILDFIRES CREATE DEVASTATION FOR TIMBER AND WILDLIFE




There was a time years ago when I worked as a journalist for Willamette Industries, creating and producing newsletters about how the company’s policies promoted good habitat for wildlife. One of the events I visited as an observer was watching as professionals in the industry deliberately set fires, prescribed fires, for the good not only for timber growing on the lands but for wildlife living on the company’s acreage.

Firefighters combating wildfires in southwest Louisiana

There are fires burning now on timber lands, especially in southwest Louisiana that are anything but prescribed; these are out of control wildfires like the ones we often read about devastating hundreds of thousands of acres out west.

Todd Martin, who lives in Winn Parish, is President and CEO of Southern Loggers Cooperative. Martin provided insight into prescribed fires versus wildfires. “One of the most valuable tools used in the forestry industry are prescribed fires. These are intentionally set. Weather conditions have to be right where there is little or no chance that the fire intentionally set doesn’t turn into a wildfire,” said Martin.

Wildlife such as deer, turkey and quail benefit from prescribed fire in that beneficial browse and tender forage plants are generated. When a wildfire goes through, it chars and burns everything which seriously limits what wildlife have available, according to Martin. “What we are seeing now in Louisiana is an outbreak of wildfires from a standpoint I have never seen in my career,” he added.

Martin gave some mind-boggling information about the extent of these fires raging around the state, especially in southwest Louisiana. “In the month of August alone,” he said, “our state has responded to 522 fires covering over 61,000 acres. The two biggest fires are the one known as the Tiger Island fire involving over 31,000 acres with the Highway 113 fire near Pitkin covering some 8500 acres. Most of these fires are only about 50% contained so there is much work to continue until they’re extinguished. What is needed is a good prolonged rain over the affected area, something that is not in the long-range forecast as of now.

“Last week we held meetings in Lake Charles and you could look out the window of the building where we met and actually see the Tiger Island fires burning 40 miles away. This situation is more serious than people realize,” Martin said.

Three years ago, the forests in southwest Louisiana were devastated when Hurricane Laura destroyed much of the timber in the area where the fires are located today. According to Martin, the timber destroyed by the hurricane was replanted with new trees that were growing and doing well. The fires blazing in that area today have virtually wiped out all the new growth of timber that was replanted.
How did these wildfires get started?

A TV news report this week indicated that fires were deliberately set with a hefty reward waiting for someone who can identify the culprit who set southwest Louisiana ablaze.
Right now, the entire state is under a burn ban and if heeded should keep other fires from igniting under these extremely dry conditions.

Keeping our eyes on the skies for rain clouds and praying that we’ll soon get rain seems to be an obvious plan of action that will extinguish these raging fires and preventing new ones from cropping up.

The Glynn Harris
Fishing Report

BLACK BAYOU – A few bream and crappie have been biting early mornings before water temp heats up. Contact Honey Hole Tackle Shop 323-8707 for latest information.


BUSSEY BRAKE – Bass fishing continues to be fair with spinners with trailers and flipping jigs around the brush working best. A couple over 11 pounds reported. The crappie are scattered around the brush. Bream have slowed. For latest information, contact the Honey Hole at 323-8707.


OUACHITA RIVER – The water level continues to be dropping. Bass are slow to fair. Crappie are fair to good in the river lakes and the bayou on shiners or jigs. For latest information, contact the Honey Hole Tackle Shop at 323-8707.


LAKE D’ARBONNE – Bass have been fair to good early mornings on topwater lures with square bill crank baits, spinners and soft plastics working best later. Some bass are starting to school and hitting shad imitations. Crappie have been best along the channel edges and the deeper flats on shiners or jigs. Bream are slow. Catfish continue to be caught fishing cold worms and night crawlers off the banks. For latest information, call Anderson Sport Center at 368-9669 or Honey Hole Tackle Shop at 323-8707.


LAKE CLAIBORNE – Striper fishing has improved fishing shad imitation lures in the coves early mornings or late afternoons. Bream fishing has been slow. Crappie have been best fishing 8-14 deep water with some good ones reported. Also at night fishing under the lights while the bass have been best early mornings on topwater lures and at night on dark plastic worms and spinner baits. For latest information, call Kel’s Cove at 927-2264 or Terzia Tackle at 278-4498.


CANEY LAKE – Bass have been fair to good early mornings on topwater lures with square bill crank baits, spinners and soft plastics working best later. Some bass are starting to school and hitting shad imitations. Crappie have been best around the deeper tops on shiners or jigs. Bream are slow. For information contact Caney Lake Landing at 259-6649, Hooks Marina at 249-2347, Terzia Tackle at 278-4498 or the Honey Hole Tackle Shop at 323-8707.


LAKE POVERTY POINT – Fishing for catfish has improved while other species are slow. For latest reports, call Poverty Point Marina at 318/878-0101. For information, call Surplus City Landing at 318/467-2259.


LAKE YUCATAN – The water level is falling and quite low. Some catfish have been caught; other species slow. For information, call Surplus City Landing at 318/467-2259

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